Dunkirk

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:11 pm
lauradi7dw: (Default)
[personal profile] lauradi7dw
We saw the 70mm film version at the Somerville Theatre. It was worth it. Amazing, in an old fashioned kind of way. Those were real Spitfires, and some of the original little boats appeared as themselves, though the whole cast and specific plot points were fictional. At 1:42, Arthur thought it was longer than necessary. Acting very good. We both felt that the music was meant to be manipulative, and we resented it. I think it might have been better to have no music at all, just ambient sound. Filming took place in Dunkirk, Britain, the Netherlands, and a bit mysteriously, the US, probably California. Arthur has acquaintances among the stunt people. We were surprised that in a crowd of people to whom actual film matters, only a very few of us stayed for all the credits.

An analogy

Jul. 16th, 2017 10:24 am
[personal profile] apparentparadox
I've been formulating this analogy in my mind lately. It still needs some work, but I thought I'd share it anyway.

An alcoholic regularly gets drunk and drives home. Most of the time, nothing happens. Occasionally, the drunk is involved in some kind of mishap that only affects their own property (dings to the car, dents to the mailbox, etc.) One night, the drunk hits another car, killing one adult and one child, leaving the remainder of the family alive but in emotional agony and financial ruin. After sobering up, the drunk tearfully exclaims "I didn't mean to hurt anyone" and begs for forgiveness.


This is how I feel about people who register & vote Republican or who attend churches who get involved in civil matters (such as whether same sex marriage should be recognized by the government). Sure, if you asked some of those people, they would say that they personally don't agree with the Republican party or their church on those things. But, to me, they are like the drunk who didn't plan to hurt anyone. They support (through their time, money, and presence) organizations that do harm to others.

Not at Readercon

Jul. 14th, 2017 05:47 pm
lauradi7dw: (Default)
[personal profile] lauradi7dw
I knew it would need to be today or not at all, as I have other stuff happening all weekend. If I had been able to get my act together yesterday to do all the chores I need to get done today (not done, but neither is the day), I could have managed it, especially if the venue were still only about six miles from home, rather than near Quincy Adams, but nope. So a few sighs, some keeping track on twitter, and that's it. I have mixed feelings about that kind of event, anyway. I would learn a lot and make notes and have strong opinions, but also mostly keep to myself, beyond hello how are you remarks to people of my acquaintance. Clearly many people use it as a time to see old friends, but I'm usually not good at that. The exception was the first time I went, when Elizabeth Wein (eegatland) was there to read and sign and so forth. On the Friday, a friend of hers, friend's baby, and I all showed up and did nothing but hang out with Elizabeth, so that wasn't typical either. I've already started planning costumes for Arisia, reminding myself that they must be danceable (and suitable for riding the T), but I know that even though I'll be *touching* people while dancing, I won't be talking much at the event, either.
It's not that I'm shy, or that I don't like conversation. I just often can't figure out how to do it.

Turkish music in the neighborhood

Jul. 14th, 2017 05:05 pm
lauradi7dw: (Default)
[personal profile] lauradi7dw
There have been posters up in the Cary (Lexington) library for quite a while advertising a concert last night by Cambridge Musiki Cemiyeti, performing classical Turkish music. It started at 7 PM, and when I got there a little after that, the door was open and the hallway had lots of people straining to listen, because the room was full and they are pretty strict about fire limits. It's called the Large Meeting room, but that's only to distinguish it from the smaller meeting rooms. It is almost never large enough for everyone who turns up to a concert. I listened for a while, which was not entirely easy because some of the listening loiterers were chatting among themselves, including the people near me, who were not native speakers of English and were working out Turkey/Turk/Turkish, and which was appropriate when. I think that all languages should use the local words for countries and nationalities, but nobody asked me at the time languages were invented. What I realized was that while the music seemed familiar to me, I had the mental image of people dancing to it, not sitting quietly listening. I suppose I must have heard that (or a similar) group at NEFFA or the Lowell Folk Festival.

but the clothes

Jul. 11th, 2017 08:24 pm
lauradi7dw: (Default)
[personal profile] lauradi7dw
I admit that "Big computers, big hair" is a good summary of the photographs, but it's the clothes that snap me back to the time period the most
https://www.theguardian.com/technology/gallery/2016/feb/13/future-women-the-bell-lab-computer-operators-of-the-1960s-in-pictures-women-in-computing

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